©Studio JOACHIM-MORINEAU

 

 

 

 

 

  
INTERVIEW 

 

 

 

 

 

STUDIO JOACHIM-MORINEAU

 

 

 

 

 

 

  
Interview: Claudine Garcia

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Carla and jordan from Studio JOACHIM-MORINEAU, two friends who were able to unite their differences around a common requirement: quality work!

 



Jordan Morineau & Carla Joachim, Studio Joachim-Morineau ©Alexander Popelier


 

 

   GOOD SESSIONS
Could you introduce yourself in a few lines? 

   STUDIO JOACHIM-MORINEAU
Hi! We are Carla Joachim and Jordan Morineau. Two friends, designers and business partners working under the name Studio JOACHIM-MORINEAU based in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

   GS
Can you give us some information about your background, education, training formation. How did you come to what you do today?

   SJM
We are originally from France with two different backgrounds. Jordan did a cabinet-making apprenticeship and Carla studied applied arts before we met in Paris at the ENSAAMA. We did two years of industrial and product design in that school before we moved to the Design Academy Eindhoven. There, we graduated from Man and Activity in 2018.
Along our studies, we discovered we had the same wish to be the leaders of our own ideas and decisions. The creation of our company came naturally and started with our graduation project, the ceramic dripping machine Moca.







Graduation Show





   GS
If you graduated from School, what do you keep from this experience (network, methodology/structuration, investigation)

   SJM
We both agreed the product design study at ENSAAMA in Paris was a necessary bridge before the Design Academy Eindhoven. We acquired a basic industrial and technical knowledge, from materials properties to modeling softwares.

On the other hand, at the DAE, we had a completely different methodology that comes from ourselves rather than an external need. We had classes on various and unique topics such as electronic, photography or color research. Moreover, we learned to give and receive detailed feedbacks.





Design Academy Eindhoven





    SJM
It was a really intense 4 years curriculum: we had many projects at the same time with high expectations from the teachers and even more from ourselves, the students. Which means you have to learn to be well organized and to make smart design choices on a daily basis. There was a general mutual aid that is still present today among the alumnus. The Design Academy is a huge network we are happy to be part of. 

   GS
Are you a designer, an artist? Is it important to make a difference?

   SJM
We both consider ourselves as designers. The function, the use and the production technique of an object are important to us. However, looking back at certain of our projects, we sometimes have a more handcraft and scientific approach which is translated into aesthetic outcomes. In that sense, we are also artist. We don’t think it’s important to make a difference. What matters is that the outcome of your project is true to your work ethic, whether you define yourself as an artist or designer. However, it does help viewers to categorize you in order to understand your approach.

   GS
Where do you find inspiration? What are the themes touched by your work?

   SJM
Industrial processes and traditional crafts are some of our main inspirations. We like to travel and we have a particular affinity for latin and asian architectures, museums and crafts (we separately lived in Korea / Cambodia / Japan for our exchanges and internships). On top of this, we both keep ourselves updated regarding the latest existing techniques.





©Studio Joachim-Morineau  




©Manon de Vanssay  






    SJM
Saying this, we could regroup our work through different themes: crafts and technology, research and experimentation and finally mixed disciplines.

   GS
Can you highlight some of your influences and explain how it impacts your ideas? Are they evolving or changing with time?

   SJM
For example: when we began developing the first draft for the concept of the last collection, “ARCHETYPES” wasn’t a subject we just chose, but it obviously became the main link between our inspiration sources. It comes from multiple influences: from Carla’s daily confrontation to classical Parisian architectures, to Jordan’s cabinet-making background and passing by the industrial area of Eindhoven in the Netherlands, where we have our workspace.

We like to keep learning new tools, skills and gathering knowledge. And sometimes, we can make new bridges with those, which brings new/surprising outcomes in our work. We continuously evolve as we get influenced by many more subjects. It might be tricky for the viewer since it could create a radical change from one project to another.






©Studio Joachim-Morineau






©Studio Joachim-Morineau






   GS
Is there a past or a personal interest that we should know to understand your work?

   SJM
We had a few experiences abroad, learning about design, crafts and techniques. For example, Carla was an intern in Japan alongside Teruhiro Yanagihara whom was one of the initiator of the “2016/ Arita” project. It gave her a good overview of the possible collaboration between designers, craftsmen and different countries. It confirmed that one of our main goal as a studio would be to join such projects.






©Manon de Vanssay
It’s the collection « Big Bang » designed by Kueng Caputo X KIN’EMON TOEN (2016/ project, Arita JP) ©Manon de Vanssay





   GS
If you're now living in a different country than your original one, does this mix of culture have an impact on you, your work and ideas?

   SJM
We believe what we learned at the Design Academy of Eindhoven had a greater impact than the mix of our French culture with our Dutch environment. The DAE is an international school, so we were influenced by many more countries than only these two.

Young designers have a lot of opportunities here. However, the fact we come from another country probably help: usually as a foreigner, you don’t perfectly know the dutch social rules. It means we probably don’t see the possible limits we are surrounded by.

There is a large design community in the Netherlands due the numbers of design schools and the professional workspaces available around the country. Our studio is situated in Eindhoven, Brabant area, which gives us access to the latest innovative industries.





Studio Joachim-Morineau working place ©Studio Joachim-Morineau 






   GS
Do you see any difference between these two countries and systems regarding art and design?

   SJM
We left France a while ago, but what we felt as a student there, was the limitations of opportunities based on the name of your diploma and the years of experiences. In this sense, we see France as more academic with a strong national bound, influenced by the culture of the luxe. Whereas the Netherlands is more accessible and open-minded. Nevertheless, both countries being in Europe, a bridge or a connexion is easily created.

   GS
How important is the process in your work facing aesthetic or functionality?

   SJM
Aesthetic and functionality are connected. The process and limitation we impose to ourselves will depend on the expected outcome. It will for sure influence the time spent to research and develop, whether you focus on the use of the product or its aesthetic aspect. While taking into account both features are closely linked to the choice of material, production and assemblage technique.

   GS
How do you make your choice of process, materials, esthetic? Do you have a "method" like first the material then the process or the reverse…

   SJM
In our project, you can draw two mains processes:

One that start from a research, with no predefined goal other than finding ideas. Since you don’t necessarily know where you are going, every association would create surprising outcomes. There is no limits regarding a function or a specific expected aesthetic. In this process, we like to start from a technique or a craft, or a combination of both. (e.g. Moca)
 





©Studio Joachim-Morineau 
©Studio Joachim-Morineau 





   SJM
In the opposite, we would begin with kind of an idea where we would like to aim (such as for this collection, with a few products and functions). Therefore, we work on the limitations, boundaries, concept and subject. From there, we start to research and draw a lot until we arrive on the main product ideas. Then, we develop and define the shape, materials, technique of assembly till we reach the essence of the concept and we have the final outcome.


 



©Studio Joachim-Morineau




   GS
How would you describe your work to someone who's not used to the art and design's world ? A complete newbie.

   SJM
Our work is a mix of crafts, technology and industrial processes. We try to give a strong visual that would spark emotion and questions to somebody used or not to the art and design world. From experience, for example with Moca, viewers usually don’t know much about ceramic processes, but they will be triggered by the outcome and it will bring them to question us. It’s a great way to start a conversation.




 

Graduation Show ©Angeline Swinkels





   GS
What do you aim to say in general through your pieces? 

   SJM
Usually there is no specific aim at first, we are closer to product/research designers than social or conceptual ones. We don’t try to create awareness of any kind regarding world issues. We intend to produce a personal, emotional or visual link with the user. We aspire to find new aesthetic, to research different thematics and to question ourselves about the possibility in the design world and on its future.
 

 



Dripping ©Studio Joachim-Morineau
   







©Pierre Castignola




   GS
What are you expecting from viewers to note when they see your work? 

   SJM
We could hope that viewers recognize the work accomplished. They see the quality in the execution, the choice of material and assembly technique in line with the concept.
 

 


Archetypes, Tholos column/pedestal ©Studio Joachim-Morineau







   GS
If they understand or feel something different than what you meant to say or suggest, is that a problem? What does it do or would do to you?

   SJM
To like or not an object, an aesthetic or a story is really related to the personal history and to the background of the viewer. We don’t have any grip on that. But we hope they understand the value and the work that is behind an object. Constructive critics are always welcomed and important, even though it’s not always easy to hear. The problem is from the conveyed idea: if it is not understood, we have to question ourselves. Usually, we like to ask friends or family who are not related to the design world: they will probably see something we didn’t or will have more down to earth comments.

   GS

What relationship do you have with digital? 

   SJM
In our work, we are usually more attracted in the physicality and tactility of the materials and products. However in this global pandemic, you definitely need a second plan, where most of your communication happens now online. We’ve seen a surge of great 3D rendered exhibition spaces in 2020, and we took part in and visited a few. Be that as it may, we believe we can’t replace physical exhibitions and their experiences. The digital space is definitely a good addition right now, but it has (to our eyes) more value when it used for its own universes: when the projects directly start from the digital space, question it, and not only try to copy the physical world.
 



 
Arceo, Aches / Shop display / Lighting ©Isola District Milan   






   GS
As you noticed :),  the world is going through a global pandemic, does it have an impact on you, your work or project(s)? 

   SJM
We had to postpone projects abroad and exhibitions. The impact it has on our plans is indefinite. Therefore, we took this opportunity to design this new collection for the 2020 Dutch Design Week. The idea was to show another aspect of our studio and create new business opportunities. As you know, it was physically cancelled a week before the due date and the result was far away from any of our expectations. We will keep working on “Archetypes” until the situation improves and we have more visibility on the future.

   GS
Any piece of advice for young people to enter the world and system of contemporary creations? 

   SJM
Get a good group of friends. You will be able to help each others using everyone skills or to simply talk about your work and receive feedbacks. Exhibit together, it improves everyone’s quality and makes a stronger impact. Communication and pictures are definitely a key too. Not last but least, nothing is easy and it might take some time.



 
 

©mikeefoto
©mikeefoto





   GS
Do you have a new project in mind? Or a more global concept or vision you'd like to investigate in?

   SJM
We will continue to communicate digitally about our “Archetypes” collection until we can create a great physical exhibition with events around. Otherwise, we are currently looking into ways to grow as a company in these lockdown situations: probably with more services to companies aside of our own projects.

   GS
Anything you want to talk about?

   SJM
Don’t hesitate to reach us, we are always open for collaboration and partnership.

Carla & Jordan

@studio_joachimmorineau